Learning Changes Lives

More than 50% of India's fifth graders cannot read a second-grade text. You can change that by donating now.

India Giving Day

Join us in celebrating India Giving Day – a national day of philanthropy – on March 2, 2023

Get Involved

Change lives with Pratham by joining us at one of our exciting upcoming events.

Vocational Training

India accounts for 28% of the world's working age population. However, only 2% of its current workers have received any formal training.

A Second Chance

Almost 80% of India's girls drop out of school before reaching grade 8. We provide girls and women with a safe, supportive learning environment so they can complete their secondary school education.

Our Mission

Of the 250 million children worldwide who cannot read or write, two-fifths reside in India, where for a quarter-century Pratham has been working to alleviate this crisis.

We develop low-cost solutions to improve the quality of learning and work with governments to take them to scale.

Our community-driven approach has engaged hundreds of thousands of volunteers and has affected the lives of 75 million Indian children.

Featured News

3 reasons to support India Giving Day with Pratham

Pratham selected to receive funding from Google.org Impact Challenge for Women & Girls

Pratham CEO Dr. Rukmini Banerji awarded the 2021 Yidan Prize for Education Development

The Economist on TaRL

The Effects of India's yearlong school closures

Facing the realities of India's post-pandemic job market

The impact of India's ​lockdown on girls' education

World Bank Panel Calls TaRL "A Smart Buy"

Our Work

Learning and Literacy

Girls' Education

Vocational Training

Research and Advocacy

In Profile

A DIFFERENT PATH FOR ROHIT

“Coming from a business family, I never had any exposure to the nonprofit sector,“ admits Rohit Shinde. An independent spirit, Rohit decided early on to take a different path than his parents had planned for him.

After earning a degree in hotel management and a PGDBA in human resources, Rohit went on to become a distinguished chef for some of Mumbai’s most renowned five-star hotels.

It was his wife, a social worker, who would lead him down a different path altogether.